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About Pruett-Harris, Jackson-Latham
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Our ancestors came from England and Scotland, via Northern Ireland, to colonial America. Much earlier, others 
were the Norsemen Vikings of Denmark who conquered France and England. Later generations from France, 
protestants during the Reformation, fled religious persecution by the Catholics, immigrated to England, anglicized 
their names, then continued to colonial America. Our ancestors from both the paternal and maternal lines who 
were first to these shores were of the Quaker faith, and others, almost exclusively, were Protestant/Huguenots. 
The only Catholics in any of our lines, were the Calverts (see below). Only one line traces back to the Puritans of 
Plymouth. 

A number of the earliest English and Scot ancestors were Indian Traders and to facilitate acceptance among 
the tribes, married women from high-ranking families of the Powhatan, Cherokee, Catawba and Creek/Muskogee 
nations. We are lucky in that good records were maintained in England and France, and among the Quakers, so we 
can trace back to far distant ancestors. 

DNA evidence supports the following ethnic makeup for our line from my generation — 99% European, 
including: Western Europe 35% (research indicates this means France), Ireland 23%, Great Britain (including 
Scotland) 22%, Scandinavia 17%, Italy or Greece 2%, and Caucasus 1%. Initial DNA testing for ethnicity 
indicated no Native American or African, however, there are numerous Native American DNA matches to 
individuals in the report. A match does no indicate which Native American tribe, but research shows many 
Cherokee, and a few Catawba, Shawnee and Creek connections.

Our ancestors were planters, weavers, clockmakers, horticulturists, land speculators, farmers, blacksmiths, 
Indian traders, abolitionists, colonial burgesses, mayors, generals, a U.S. senator, state governor, Presidents 
Washington, Lincoln, Harrison and Taylor, postmasters and mistresses, a midwife, clergymen, millers, 
scouts, land surveyors and Indian chiefs. 

In America, our ancestors served in colonial militias, the Revolutionary War, the Regulators, the War of 1812, 
the Civil War, World War I, World War II the Korean Conflict and Vietnam. Several were Revolutionary War 
soldiers and officers, therefore anyone in our line who is so inclined would be eligible for membership in the 
DAR, Sons of the American Revolution or Society of the Cincinnati.

Our ancestor, Captain John Shuttleworth Posey, III., friend, neighbor and fox hunting companion of 
President George Washington, owned a farm called Rover's Delight on the Potomac River adjacent to Mount 
Vernon. From there, he operated a fishery, and a ferry station, taking people across the Potomac. President 
Washington and his family visited and dined in the home of Captain Posey and Captain Posey and his family 
frequently visited and dined with Washington and his family at Mount Vernon. President Washington took a 
great interest in one of Captain Posey's sons, Thomas, who later became a General in the Revolutionary 
War, was Governor of Indiana, held a Senate seat from Louisiana and was Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky. 
Thomas Posey was rumored to be Washington's illegitimate son. 

Letters between George Washington and Captain Posey are archived in the Library of Congress and 
accessible online. After Captain Posey's death, his property became a part of Mount Vernon and is now 
called the "Ferry Station." 

We are related to both President Andrew Jackson and "Old Hickory" Confederate General Thomas Jackson. 
My generation's GGreat Grandmother Amanda "Manda" Davis Jackson's great grandfather was the younger
brother of Confederate President Jefferson Davis's great grandfather. 

Our ancestor, Robert Jackson (1620), Separatist Movement leader, came to New Plymouth in 1643 and 
founded the town of Hempstead, New York on Long Island.

On the Prewitt/Pruett/Pruitt side, our first ancestor to these shores (proven by DNA matches) was Thomas 
Prewitt, who settled in Charles Town, became a planter and had many sons. These Prewitt/Pruett/Pruitts 
migrated from Charles Town to Amelia, then Halifax Virginia before splitting off and settling near Spartanburg, 
South Carolina, where they founded Pruitt Town. Several younger generation members of the 
Pruitt family continuing on to settle in the northwest corner of the Mississippi Territory (Alabama), now 
Lauderdale County, where they founded Pruitton, Alabama, near Muscle Shoals. 

English knights, lords and ladies are among our ancestors. Their birth, marriage, title and manor houses are 
listed in BURKE'S PEERAGE - the guide to royal, aristocratic and historical families. Many were granted land 
in England and Northern Ireland for serving the English crown. A number of these manor houses and ancient 
castles still stand. Some ancestors were "visited" with coats of arms. Anthony Jackson II (1599), a strong 
supporter of the cause of the House of Stuart, was locked in the Tower of London from 1651-59 for 
proclaiming Charles II the King of England and Scotland. Sir Anthony was the 12th-great grandson of King 
Edward I through his mother, Ursula Hildyard. 

DNA evidence shows we are descended, through our Grandmother Jessie Harris (alias Harrison-Calvert) 
Pruett, and through the Jackson line, from Sir George Calvert (1579-1632), the First Baron Baltimore, 
Proprietary Governor of Maryland. He was an English politician and colonizer. He achieved domestic 
political success as a Member of Parliament and later Secretary of State under King James I. He lost much 
of his political power after his support for a failed marriage alliance between Prince Charles and the Spanish 
House of Habsburg royal family. Rather than continue in politics, he resigned all of his political offices in 
1625 except for his position on the Privy Council and declared his Catholicism publicly. He was granted the 
title of First Baron Baltimore in the Irish peerage upon his resignation. Baltimore Manor was located in 
County Longford, Ireland.

Calvert took an interest in the colonization of the New World, at first for commercial reasons and later to 
create a refuge for English Catholics. He became the proprietor of Avalon, the first sustained English 
settlement on the southeastern peninsula on the island of Newfoundland (off the eastern coast of modern 
Canada). Discouraged by its cold and sometimes inhospitable climate and the sufferings of the settlers, Sir 
George looked for a more suitable spot further south and sought a new royal charter to settle the region, 
which would become the state of Maryland. Calvert died five weeks before the new Charter was sealed, 
leaving the settlement of the Maryland colony to his son Cecilius, (1605-1675). His second son Leonard 
Calvert, (1606-1647), was the first colonial governor of the Province of Maryland. He is my generation's 9XG 
grandfather, on both the Pruett and the Jackson sides. I have no idea how rare or common it is to have a 
"double" great grandfather, but the combination of research and DNA evidence supports this.

Historians have long recognized George Calvert as the founder of Maryland, in spirit if not in fact, along with 
the role of Leonard with his intimate relationship with his older brother back in England, plus being on the 
site as the Colony was first settled as extremely advantageous.

These are only a few highlights of relationships discovered while building this tree. We are a family that 
shares and preserves its stories. You will find many fascinating tales in the Story section of the website. Our 
ever-expending family history library now contains many books written about the various family lines. At 
some point I will list the titles and authors on this site in case others would like to acquire some of them.

The Quakers kept excellent records of families in their society, which helped research into the colonial era 
during pre-census times, and when the census began and listed by name only the head of each household 
and number of occupants within specified age groups. Also helpful, our people were landowners and many 
early land records and last wills are accessible online. Ship passenger lists, marriage, military and death 
records helped to fill in many other blanks.

This family tree is still under construction. I attached source material and verification to all entries where it 
was available. Several guesses and mysteries remain, and I continue to work toward solving these. As it 
stands, we have many lines going far back. At the sixth generation, there are 32 separate family lines, and 
many of them go back ten generations — a few lines extend back to as many as twenty generations. Hard 
evidence supports the accuracy of most records for at least the first six generations. English and French 
official records for the earlier generations are generally accepted as accurate, as are the Quaker records. I 
continually search for proof of earlier generations and add it as it is located. DNA testing has verified 
several of the lines.

Please post a note or send me an email if you spot errors or typos as you browse through. I know there must 
be some. I am aware that one or two connections are unproven and possibly incorrect, but have left them in 
place until I can locate verification.

I invite you to visit all the different areas and aspects of the site, read the stories, click through the photos 
and other images, trace back from your name to the various lines and read about our marvelous forefathers 
and mothers. Ours is a family to be proud of, comprised of good, brave and noble people. At the bottom of 
this page are some navigational suggestions you may find useful.

Thank you for visiting. Enjoy!
Ancestors of ******
Note: for privacy reasons names of living persons are excluded.
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Getting Around
There are several ways to browse the family tree. The Tree View graphically shows the relationship of selected person to their kin. The Family View shows the person you have selected in the center, with his/her photo on the left and notes on the right. Above are the father and mother and below are the children. The Ancestor Chart shows the person you have selected in the left, with the photograph above and children below. On the right are the parents, grandparents and great-grandparents. The Descendant Chart shows the person you have selected in the left, with the photograph and parents below. On the right are the children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Do you know who your second cousins are? Try the Kinship Relationships Tool. Your site can generate various Reports for each name in your family tree. You can select a name from the list on the top-right menu bar.

In addition to the charts and reports you have Photo Albums, the Events list and the Relationships tool. Family photographs are organized in the Photo Index. Each Album's photographs are accompanied by a caption. To enlarge a photograph just click on it. Keep up with the family birthdays and anniversaries in the Events list. Birthdays and Anniversaries of living persons are listed by month. Want to know how you are related to anybody ? Check out the Relationships tool.




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